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With all the excitement of the hummingbird discovery yesterday, I quickly shoved aside my original idea to relay my experience of a half-hour spent with a busy bee. So here I am, revisiting a topic that might not be as interesting as the soon-to-be arrival of two miniature birds, but still a topic worth sharing because of its philosophical underpinnings.  So let me share with you the story of a woman, a bee, and a discovery of the mind.

It all began yesterday morning when I decided it was time to do some pooper-scooper therapy (yeah, right). As I was bent over, schnoz to the ground, my ears were awakened by the nearby buzz of an ordinary bee. Since my ears being awakened by a bee was much more inviting than my nose being awakened by the smell of recently deposited, um, therapy clods, I chucked the scooper and settled down on the grass to watch the bee in admiration. Or at least in procrastination.

He jumped from yellow flower to yellow flower and back to the original yellow flower, over and over and over again. With each landing he stabbed his proboscis into the center of the flower with an enthusiasm one would only expect on an initial visit, especially from a male of the species. But somehow this bee…this buzzing, pollen-spreading, sex machine…just couldn’t get enough of these simple yellow flowers, the sole objects of his affection. What was the mystery behind this dance of the nectar? Why was this such a fascinating spectacle to behold? How on earth could I sit there amongst dung piles and never want this moment to end? Honestly, I didn’t know the answer to any of these questions, and after awhile it didn’t matter, because it was time for the bee to buzz off.

Within a few minutes I had completely forgotten about my “bee experience” after happening upon a hummingbird nest, and two freshly laid eggs. Suddenly, all the deep thoughts that were conjured up during my time with the bee were replaced with pure excitement over the discovery of these eggs. As small as they were, these eggs represented to me a finding of a much greater magnitude than that of a commonplace insect slurping nectar from some overgrown weeds. So that was it.  I threw the bee out with the dog dung and essentially lost (albeit temporarily) an opportunity to discover something deeper that lurked in the mind. Instead, I chose to focus every last bit of energy on my feathered friend and her soon-to-be hatchlings. I could hardly await another morning in which to do some detective work.

So this morning I sprung out of bed and leapt out the back door to catch my first glimpse of the hummingbird and her bassinet. As she wandered off in search of prey for her four-times-per-hour feeding, I snuck a peak into the nest and found the same two eggs, as yet to be hatched. Knowing very well that those eggs would not hatch in one night I was still expecting something, anything. After all, this was THE event of the previous day.

Deciding that it was best not to loiter around the nest for too long, I journeyed out for a quick walk around the neighborhood. About ten minutes into my walk, I spied a planter box full of several very interesting-looking flowers. Curiosity tugging at my sleeve, I bent over to sniff a single pink bloom, and then another, and then another. I looked up self-consciously, half-expecting the owner of the residence to chase me off with a broom. Then, much to my surprise, I again found myself bent over, this time inhaling the perfume from a queer-looking yellow blossom. And then a white blossom, and a red blossom, and so on and so forth, until I had an out-of-body experience and could actually hear myself buzzing. Yes, it had actually happened. I had stopped to smell the flowers and had turned into a bee…in spirit anyway.  Then a thought occurred to me. People often say that art imitates life, but I suddenly realized that it might be more accurate to say that life imitates life. And, thanks to a few simple flowers, I was living in the moment, just like the bee. And mind you, I wasn’t looking for the biggest, grandest, most important moment. I was enjoying just this little moment.

And that, my dear friends, is the story of a woman, a bee, and a discovery of the mind.